Student productions win big: National Radio Broadcasters competition

Student productions win big: National Radio Broadcasters competition

February 1

Northwestern College students flexed major media muscle at the intercollegiate National Religious Broadcasters (NRB) 2013 Student Production Competition, winning eight awards in video and radio, including three first place awards.

"We congratulate all of our students. They pursue Christ joyfully and faithfully and allow him to fuel their creative craft," said Mark Seignious, associate professor of communication, "Our prayer is that these students will always strive to remember that they 'have been entrusted with the Gospel, so they speak not to please man but to please God, who tests their hearts' (1 Thess. 2:4)."

Audio students captured first place audio awards in two of four categories, Best Radio Drama and Best Promo/Imaging/Branding, and a second place in Radio News and Sports. In the film/video competition, students swept all awards for the PSA/Commercial category and took second place in Documentary/News and third in Short Film.

This year's winners, all representing Northwestern's electronic media communication major, add to the program's successful track record at NRB competitions: last year Northwestern took first at NRB's 36 Hour Challenge and finished strong at the 2012 Student Production Competition.

 

2013 Northwestern College iNRB winners:

Radio Feature/Radio Drama
1st Place Anthony Mansmith and Aaron McIntire Momentary Troubles

Radio Promo/Imaging/Branding
1st Place: Chris Bell To Write Love on her Arms

Radio News and Sports
2nd Place: Aaron McIntire The Hunger Games: Freaky Fad or Fantastic

Television/Video - PSA/Commercial/Promo
1st Place: Luke Stapleton and Grant Swanson, Bessy
2nd Place: Chris Behnen Commute
3rd Place: Krista Koester Third Day - Behind the Scenes

Documentary
2nd Place: Anna Carey, Poet

Film/Short
3rd Place: Chris Behnen, Man in the Mirror

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Chasing the Dream

Chase Donahue, rightMost of us appreciate that one funny ad on T.V. that leaves us laughing, but that’s about it; we’re always ready to get back to our show.Nobody advertising, right?

Probably—but then there’s public relations Chase Donahue (pictured, right).

"Advertising seems to mold all of my interests, gifts, and desires into one field. My work thrives when I can be creative, strategic, and systematic."

In October, Donahue won a free pass to New York City for the advertising adventure of his life.

“I saw a contest on Advertising Week for five people to play a famous Creative Director in Words With Friends. I applied, won a chance to play him, and I actually beat him.”

At the annual conference  Donahue careened through 18 hour event-packed days with thousands of people, all of them on the go.

“I met some of the most influential decision-makers and a thinker of our culture, sat through hours of influential seminars, and was even offered an internship at a phenomenal advertising agency.”

More than a thrilling experience; Ad Week was a revelation.

“I learned that we can all change the world. That’s a big statement, but I wholeheartedly mean that,” he said, “When we take a minute to sit back and think about it, we are infinitely gifted and talented human beings. We are far too blessed to be mediocre with our abilities.”

With conviction that reached into his mind and spirit, Donahue returned home ready to confront broken realities with powerful ideas.

“Advertising at its best can challenge, inspire, and create something that has never been done…[it’s]the best place to work to have the opportunity to create new things and change the world with big ideas.”

Perhaps Donahue’s world-changer advertising approach isn’t so uncommon, especially in a generation that is constantly shouting its need for meaning and purpose. And yet, he acknowledged that the weight of that need does not fall on human shoulders.

“Our ability to make a positive change is not because we are that good, but because God is that great.”

Dream a Big Dream: Chase's blog debut on AWSC

The transformation that started in New York is showing true in Donahue's life months later.Chase started meeting with professors on campus for encouragement, but that's just the start.

Hoping to incite passion in peers and help people leave mediocrity behind, Donahue has a message to get out and an dream up his sleeve.  He just wrote his first post, Dream a Big Dream With Me for the Advertising Week Social Club's blog and we've got his best pointers for you:

  • From birth we’ve been dreamers – somewhere along the line as we grow up, that fervor is quenched.
  • We don’t consciously choose to give up our gifts and dreams to be ordinary – it’s just the societal norm.
  • Pursuing our dreams is terrifying, and rightfully so – if we have truly dreamt large enough. But it’s not about whether or not you’re a risk-taker; it’s about the life that you want to live.
  • Our goal is to uncover work and life that is rewarding, exciting, and fruitful
  • Our potential is not something that we should wish we had attained in life – it is something that we should surpass daily.
  • Stop saying, “I’ll start tomorrow.” Our future is determined by what we do today – not in a week.

Donahue is taking his own advice, getting started with his dreams using Innove Project.  Talk with Chase on Twitter @ChaseDonahue about your dream!

As Chase says, "We are all equipped to change the world; it’s time that we do."

Josh Swore in Champion Magazine

 

 

 

 

Linebacker turns foes into Jelly

Sundance Film Festival: A Northwestern first

Professor Ann Sorenson and six film students will be making a first ever Northwestern appearance at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah in January. For one week Laticia Mattson '15, David DeLeon '14, Anna Carey '13,  Krista Koester '14, Chris Behnen '13 and Mike Niedermeyer '12 will be screening upcoming films and joining five other university groups every morning to participate in the Windrider Forum, a gathering of Christian filmmakers and students focused on faith-based discussion and learning.

Sorenson hopes the Sundance experience "widens [the students'] world in a way that will bless them," wherever they may be in their film careers.

Mattson, excited to see potential blockbusters and mingle with filmmakers or celebrities, has had an experience like Sundance on her bucket list for awhile.

"Ever since I was a kid I loved writing scripts and making videos with my family and friends," she said, "I've always had a passion for storytelling and entertaining others through filmmaking."

The story of film at NWC

Upcoming filmmakers like Mattson are a growing breed at Northwestern, led by Sorenson's contagious film fervor.  Prior to teaching at Northwestern, Sorenson directed theatre at Minnehaha Academy in Minneapolis where her love for stories lived on stage, no where near the big screen. One day she went to a "horrible movie" with a single beautiful shot in it and upon leaving, she had a passing thought: you're going to make a movie someday.

At first, she said it was laughable, but that next summer Sorenson enrolled in an intensive film class at UCLA and came back with a wild idea.  Instead of a spring theatre production at Minnehaha, Sorenson and her students made a movie.

"I was totally over my head," she remembered, "Naivete was bliss, but it got me out of my comfort zone."

After that initial project, Sorenson earned her M.F.A. in Film from Columbia University and returned to Minneapolis, starting a new career in film.

"I love stories so much and I love the visual element of film.  It’s an everything art, a combination of all the art forms." 

After their time in Utah, Northwestern's film department will be preparing for their annual Five16 Film Festival on April 15, where students screen their best flicks to a packed out audience in Maranatha Hall. 

 Watch winners from Five16 2012:

 Cherish - By David DeLeon

 

Poet - By Anna Carey

Sundance Festival: A Northwestern first

Dec. 17—Professor Ann Sorenson and six film students will be making a first ever Northwestern appearance at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah in January. For one week Laticia Mattson '15, David DeLeon '14, Anna Carey '13,  Krista Koester '14, Chris Behnen '13 and Mike Niedermeyer '12 will be screening upcoming films and joining five other university groups every morning to participate in the Windrider Forum, a gathering of Christian filmmakers and students focused on faith-based discussion and learning.

Sorenson hopes the Sundance experience "widens [the students'] world in a way that will bless them," wherever they may be in their film careers.

Mattson, excited to see potential blockbusters and mingle with filmmakers or celebrities, has had an experience like Sundance on her bucket list for awhile.

"Ever since I was a kid I loved writing scripts and making videos with my family and friends," she said, "I've always had a passion for storytelling and entertaining others through filmmaking."

The story of film at NWC

Upcoming filmmakers like Mattson are a growing breed at Northwestern, led by Sorenson's contagious film fervor.  Prior to teaching at Northwestern, Sorenson directed theatre at Minnehaha Academy in Minneapolis where her love for stories lived on stage, no where near the big screen. One day she went to a "horrible movie" with a single beautiful shot in it and upon leaving, she had a passing thought: you're going to make a movie someday.

At first, she said it was laughable, but that next summer Sorenson enrolled in an intensive film class at UCLA and came back with a wild idea.  Instead of a spring theatre production at Minnehaha, Sorenson and her students made a movie.

"I was totally over my head," she remembered, "Naivete was bliss, but it got me out of my comfort zone."

After that initial project, Sorenson earned her M.F.A. in Film from Columbia University and returned to Minneapolis, starting a new career in film.

"I love stories so much and I love the visual element of film.  It’s an everything art, a combination of all the art forms." 

After their time in Utah, Northwestern's film department will be preparing for their annual Five16 Film Festival on April 15, where students screen their best flicks to a packed out audience in Maranatha Hall. 

 Watch winners from Five16 2012:

 Cherish - By David DeLeon

 

Poet - By Anna Carey

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