College Choir & Orchestra unite

The Northwestern College Choir & Orchestra will be performing a homecoming concert to conclude their Spring 2013 Tour on Friday, March 22, at 7:30 p.m at Calvary Church in Roseville.

Orchestra repertoire includes masterworks by Johannes Brahms, Edvard Grieg, and Antonin Dvorak. The choir will perform hymns, gospel music and spirituals, featuring the Midwest premiere of Langston Hughes' poem Fire by Illinois composer John Orfe. Together, the ensembles will perform Meteor Shower by Owl City's Adam Young and selections from Ralph Vaughan Williams' Five Mystical Songs.

Concert details can be found online or contact the Northwestern College music tours office at 651-631-2080.

The Northwestern Orchestra and College Choir join forces this spring for a collaborative tour to northwestern Minnesota and the Fargo/Moorhead area, presenting a series of concerts in Alexandria, Osakis and at several venues in Fargo, North Dakota including Bethel Evangelical Free Church, and choral exchanges with Oak Grove Lutheran High School, Fargo North High School and Park Christian School in Moorhead.

Tour Itinerary:

  • Thursday, March 7 in Osakis and Alexandria, Minnesota
  • Friday, Saturday & Sunday, March 8-10 in Fargo, North Dakota
  • Monday, March 11 in Moorhead, Minnesota and Fargo, North Dakota
  • Homecoming Concert: Friday, March 22 in Roseville, Minnesota

 

Tom Gisler in Star Tribune

 

 

 

Northwestern's Gisler doesn't let diabetes keep him off the court

Lee Strobel visits Northwestern

Lee Strobel visits Northwestern

Lee Strobel , author of The Case for Christ, The Case for Faith and The Case for a Creator was on campus February 6 and 7 speaking in chapel and at several other gatherings, sharing his story and encouraging leaders.

We connected with him between events to learn more about his journey and thoughts on understanding the facts of the Christian faith.

 

Ask Lee questions: asklee@leestrobel.com.
 

 

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President's Report 2011–12

From the President

When college admissions materials say that an institution is “academically excellent” does a reader dismiss it as hype? What does the term truly signify? What evidence supports the assertion?

At Northwestern, we ask ourselves these questions often and each time the answers lead to confidence in this: We say we are academically excellent because it is true.

Faculty scholarship and research are reaching new heights. Exemplifying this is Dr. Ed Glenny (Biblical & Theological Studies), who has published and presented numerous articles and papers during the college’s first endowed J. Edwin Hartill Professorship.

Last spring, Dr. Jonathan Den Hartog (History) was selected as a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University (New Jersey) with the James Madison Program for American Ideals and Institutions.

Student success and opportunities

Academic quality is evident in our students. Charissa Doebler ’12 is Northwestern’s ninth Fulbright Scholar in the past nine years. The Fulbright program only selects America’s brightest and best.

New programs—such as the five-year Bachelor of Arts/Master of Divinity degree, the proposed accelerated nursing degree, and “Degree in Three”—reflect excellence in a proactive approach to help students and families with the rising costs of college.

Faculty and students are collaborating on research projects, publishing articles, and presenting papers. You will see several examples of this in the annual report.

Part of our DNA

“Academically excellent” is simply part of our DNA and we see excellence emerging in new graduate and online learning programs, all while maintaining our mission as a Christ-centered institution of higher education. Above all, we seek to give God our highest and best.

At the threshold of our move to university status in the coming year, I could not be more confident and enthusiastic about Northwestern’s academic excellence and its future.
 

Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D.
President
Northwestern College and Northwestern Media

 

What's Inside:

View the Annual Report

  • Academic Highlights
  • Media Impact
  • Arts & Athletics
  • Collaborative Research
  • Facts & Figures

 View as flipbook

2010-11 President's Report PDF View as PDF

 

Annual Report Archives

Annual Report Flip Book2010–11 flipbook

Annual Report PDF2010–11 PDF

Annual Report Flip Book2009–10 flipbook

Annual Report PDF2009–10 PDF

Annual Repot PDF 2008–09 PDF

 

Alumni King brothers in the Pioneer Press

Alumni King brothers in the Pioneer Press

King Brothers Clothiers partner with Don Shelby for new 'Shelby Knot' tie collection

Alumni Kenny '10 and Danny King '10, in Pioneer Press and Haven Magazine

Kenny told us why he's personally invested in this business:

"Style is something we’ve been passionate about for a very long time. As many men our age have done, we grew up looking at photos of our grandpas and wanted to look just like them. It’s funny how things tend to skip a generation.

We’re twins, and as such, there was often a desire for us to be our own person. It was always so easy for people to group us together: 'Let’s invite Kenny and Danny,' or  'I’m going over to Kenny and Danny’s house.'

What we wore helped us to establish ourselves as separate units. We didn’t share clothes growing up because even at a very young age, we learned one’s clothing was a key component to establishing an image. People always associated us with what we were wearing: 'Kenny is in the red today, and Danny is in the blue.'

Today, our passion continues. We have different jobs (Kenny is morning anchor for ABC 6 News, Rochester, and Danny is  the Youth Pastor at Roseville Covenant Church) and different lives these days, but our love for style has continued to be a part of who we are – it’s what’s been driving King Brothers Clothiers, the ShelbyKnot Collection, and has served as a way for us to remain close as brothers, friends, and now business partners."

 – Kenny King

  King Brothers Clothiers

 

  Ties available at:
  Heimie's Haberdashery (St. Paul)
  Martin Patrick 3 (Mpls) 

 

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Student productions win big: National Radio Broadcasters competition

Student productions win big: National Radio Broadcasters competition

February 1

Northwestern College students flexed major media muscle at the intercollegiate National Religious Broadcasters (NRB) 2013 Student Production Competition, winning eight awards in video and radio, including three first place awards.

"We congratulate all of our students. They pursue Christ joyfully and faithfully and allow him to fuel their creative craft," said Mark Seignious, associate professor of communication, "Our prayer is that these students will always strive to remember that they 'have been entrusted with the Gospel, so they speak not to please man but to please God, who tests their hearts' (1 Thess. 2:4)."

Audio students captured first place audio awards in two of four categories, Best Radio Drama and Best Promo/Imaging/Branding, and a second place in Radio News and Sports. In the film/video competition, students swept all awards for the PSA/Commercial category and took second place in Documentary/News and third in Short Film.

This year's winners, all representing Northwestern's electronic media communication major, add to the program's successful track record at NRB competitions: last year Northwestern took first at NRB's 36 Hour Challenge and finished strong at the 2012 Student Production Competition.

 

2013 Northwestern College iNRB winners:

Radio Feature/Radio Drama
1st Place Anthony Mansmith and Aaron McIntire Momentary Troubles

Radio Promo/Imaging/Branding
1st Place: Chris Bell To Write Love on her Arms

Radio News and Sports
2nd Place: Aaron McIntire The Hunger Games: Freaky Fad or Fantastic

Television/Video - PSA/Commercial/Promo
1st Place: Luke Stapleton and Grant Swanson, Bessy
2nd Place: Chris Behnen Commute
3rd Place: Krista Koester Third Day - Behind the Scenes

Documentary
2nd Place: Anna Carey, Poet

Film/Short
3rd Place: Chris Behnen, Man in the Mirror

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Chasing the Dream

Chase Donahue, rightMost of us appreciate that one funny ad on T.V. that leaves us laughing, but that’s about it; we’re always ready to get back to our show.Nobody advertising, right?

Probably—but then there’s public relations Chase Donahue (pictured, right).

"Advertising seems to mold all of my interests, gifts, and desires into one field. My work thrives when I can be creative, strategic, and systematic."

In October, Donahue won a free pass to New York City for the advertising adventure of his life.

“I saw a contest on Advertising Week for five people to play a famous Creative Director in Words With Friends. I applied, won a chance to play him, and I actually beat him.”

At the annual conference  Donahue careened through 18 hour event-packed days with thousands of people, all of them on the go.

“I met some of the most influential decision-makers and a thinker of our culture, sat through hours of influential seminars, and was even offered an internship at a phenomenal advertising agency.”

More than a thrilling experience; Ad Week was a revelation.

“I learned that we can all change the world. That’s a big statement, but I wholeheartedly mean that,” he said, “When we take a minute to sit back and think about it, we are infinitely gifted and talented human beings. We are far too blessed to be mediocre with our abilities.”

With conviction that reached into his mind and spirit, Donahue returned home ready to confront broken realities with powerful ideas.

“Advertising at its best can challenge, inspire, and create something that has never been done…[it’s]the best place to work to have the opportunity to create new things and change the world with big ideas.”

Perhaps Donahue’s world-changer advertising approach isn’t so uncommon, especially in a generation that is constantly shouting its need for meaning and purpose. And yet, he acknowledged that the weight of that need does not fall on human shoulders.

“Our ability to make a positive change is not because we are that good, but because God is that great.”

Dream a Big Dream: Chase's blog debut on AWSC

The transformation that started in New York is showing true in Donahue's life months later.Chase started meeting with professors on campus for encouragement, but that's just the start.

Hoping to incite passion in peers and help people leave mediocrity behind, Donahue has a message to get out and an dream up his sleeve.  He just wrote his first post, Dream a Big Dream With Me for the Advertising Week Social Club's blog and we've got his best pointers for you:

  • From birth we’ve been dreamers – somewhere along the line as we grow up, that fervor is quenched.
  • We don’t consciously choose to give up our gifts and dreams to be ordinary – it’s just the societal norm.
  • Pursuing our dreams is terrifying, and rightfully so – if we have truly dreamt large enough. But it’s not about whether or not you’re a risk-taker; it’s about the life that you want to live.
  • Our goal is to uncover work and life that is rewarding, exciting, and fruitful
  • Our potential is not something that we should wish we had attained in life – it is something that we should surpass daily.
  • Stop saying, “I’ll start tomorrow.” Our future is determined by what we do today – not in a week.

Donahue is taking his own advice, getting started with his dreams using Innove Project.  Talk with Chase on Twitter @ChaseDonahue about your dream!

As Chase says, "We are all equipped to change the world; it’s time that we do."

Josh Swore in Champion Magazine

 

 

 

 

Linebacker turns foes into Jelly

Sundance Film Festival: A Northwestern first

Professor Ann Sorenson and six film students will be making a first ever Northwestern appearance at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah in January. For one week Laticia Mattson '15, David DeLeon '14, Anna Carey '13,  Krista Koester '14, Chris Behnen '13 and Mike Niedermeyer '12 will be screening upcoming films and joining five other university groups every morning to participate in the Windrider Forum, a gathering of Christian filmmakers and students focused on faith-based discussion and learning.

Sorenson hopes the Sundance experience "widens [the students'] world in a way that will bless them," wherever they may be in their film careers.

Mattson, excited to see potential blockbusters and mingle with filmmakers or celebrities, has had an experience like Sundance on her bucket list for awhile.

"Ever since I was a kid I loved writing scripts and making videos with my family and friends," she said, "I've always had a passion for storytelling and entertaining others through filmmaking."

The story of film at NWC

Upcoming filmmakers like Mattson are a growing breed at Northwestern, led by Sorenson's contagious film fervor.  Prior to teaching at Northwestern, Sorenson directed theatre at Minnehaha Academy in Minneapolis where her love for stories lived on stage, no where near the big screen. One day she went to a "horrible movie" with a single beautiful shot in it and upon leaving, she had a passing thought: you're going to make a movie someday.

At first, she said it was laughable, but that next summer Sorenson enrolled in an intensive film class at UCLA and came back with a wild idea.  Instead of a spring theatre production at Minnehaha, Sorenson and her students made a movie.

"I was totally over my head," she remembered, "Naivete was bliss, but it got me out of my comfort zone."

After that initial project, Sorenson earned her M.F.A. in Film from Columbia University and returned to Minneapolis, starting a new career in film.

"I love stories so much and I love the visual element of film.  It’s an everything art, a combination of all the art forms." 

After their time in Utah, Northwestern's film department will be preparing for their annual Five16 Film Festival on April 15, where students screen their best flicks to a packed out audience in Maranatha Hall. 

 Watch winners from Five16 2012:

 Cherish - By David DeLeon

 

Poet - By Anna Carey

Sundance Festival: A Northwestern first

Dec. 17—Professor Ann Sorenson and six film students will be making a first ever Northwestern appearance at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah in January. For one week Laticia Mattson '15, David DeLeon '14, Anna Carey '13,  Krista Koester '14, Chris Behnen '13 and Mike Niedermeyer '12 will be screening upcoming films and joining five other university groups every morning to participate in the Windrider Forum, a gathering of Christian filmmakers and students focused on faith-based discussion and learning.

Sorenson hopes the Sundance experience "widens [the students'] world in a way that will bless them," wherever they may be in their film careers.

Mattson, excited to see potential blockbusters and mingle with filmmakers or celebrities, has had an experience like Sundance on her bucket list for awhile.

"Ever since I was a kid I loved writing scripts and making videos with my family and friends," she said, "I've always had a passion for storytelling and entertaining others through filmmaking."

The story of film at NWC

Upcoming filmmakers like Mattson are a growing breed at Northwestern, led by Sorenson's contagious film fervor.  Prior to teaching at Northwestern, Sorenson directed theatre at Minnehaha Academy in Minneapolis where her love for stories lived on stage, no where near the big screen. One day she went to a "horrible movie" with a single beautiful shot in it and upon leaving, she had a passing thought: you're going to make a movie someday.

At first, she said it was laughable, but that next summer Sorenson enrolled in an intensive film class at UCLA and came back with a wild idea.  Instead of a spring theatre production at Minnehaha, Sorenson and her students made a movie.

"I was totally over my head," she remembered, "Naivete was bliss, but it got me out of my comfort zone."

After that initial project, Sorenson earned her M.F.A. in Film from Columbia University and returned to Minneapolis, starting a new career in film.

"I love stories so much and I love the visual element of film.  It’s an everything art, a combination of all the art forms." 

After their time in Utah, Northwestern's film department will be preparing for their annual Five16 Film Festival on April 15, where students screen their best flicks to a packed out audience in Maranatha Hall. 

 Watch winners from Five16 2012:

 Cherish - By David DeLeon

 

Poet - By Anna Carey

Off the Cuff with Jon Acuff

Jon Acuff, author of Quitter and Stuff Christians Like, spoke in chapel for a few days in November, talking about letting go of your boring view of God.  Since he was around, we thought we'd ask him a few questions:

  • What was your biggest challenge growing up and how did it change you?
  • How is support and responsibility different for someone who is single or starting a new relationship, rather than married? 
  • How did you start your blog Stuff Christians Like and why do you think it's popular?
  • What is the greatest danger and greatest opportunity for this generation? 

Watch on YouTube

Twitter Shout Out: 

@Benji_Fernandes @jcoil10 @Neecy_Bernice @TraceyTrouten & @AfiIsGolden
(for their brilliant questions)

Congratulations Benji and Jacob for winning copies of Jon's books Quitter and Stuff Christians Like in our #AskAcuff drawing!

Off the Cuff with Jon Acuff

Jon Acuff, author of Quitter and Stuff Christians Like, spoke in chapel for a few days in November, talking about letting go of your boring view of God.  Since he was around, we thought we'd ask him a few questions:

  • What was your biggest challenge growing up and how did it change you? 
  • How is support and responsibility different for someone who is single or starting a new relationship, rather than married? 
  • How did you start your blog Stuff Christians Like and why do you think it's popular?
  • What is the greatest danger and greatest opportunity for this generation? 

Hear Jon Acuff's answers on YouTube

Twitter Shout Out: 

@Benji_Fernandes @jcoil10 @Neecy_Bernice @TraceyTrouten & @AfiIsGolden
(for their brilliant questions)

Congratulations Benji and Jacob for winning copies of Jon's books Quitter and Stuff Christians Like in our #AskAcuff drawing!

Ask Jon more questions @jonacuff

Dr. Geston named 2012 Choral Director of the Year

Dec. 4—Dr. Mary Kay Geston was named Minnesota's 2012 Choral Director of the Year by the American Choral Directors Association of Minnesota in November. Geston returns to Northwestern after serving this past year as visiting associate professor of choral studies at University of Colorado Boulder.

"Minnesota is renowned as 'choral country' and has a national and international reputation for excellence in choral music, so to receive the Choral Director of the Year award from my professional colleagues in the American Choral Director's Association of Minnesota is deeply humbling," said Geston, "My joy comes from using and developing the gifts I've been given to help those around me embrace music as a gift from God while using and developing their own gifts. I love what I do!"

Upon her return to Northwestern, Geston has resumed conducting the 75-voice Women's Chorale and the Chamber Singers, simultaneously teaching choral methods, conducting and voice, and supervising secondary student teachers.

"Dr. Mary Kay Geston is the most qualified person I can think of to deserve this distinguished award," said alumna Natalie Cromwell '10 in a recommendation, "She demonstrates nothing but an overwhelming support of her students, not just in Northwestern's vocal department, but also in the music department as a whole."

In past roles ranging from chair to president, Geston is a faithful member of ACDA-MN and five other choral organizations. She is in high demand across the Midwest, having conducted All-State and honor choirs in six states and presented at several professional choral conferences.

In February, Dr. Geston conducted an all-state choir in Kentucky, and served as a panelist at the Southwest American Choral Directors Association conference in Texas. Traveling overseas in May, she worked with choirs at National Taiwan University and Kaohsiung Medical University.

NWC's first Gilman Scholarship recipients

Juniors Mai Kia Thao and Yana Lenta, and senior Miriam Navamanie are Northwestern’s first recipients of the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, a $3,000 grant allowing them to join 16 other students on Wednesday for a two-month internship tour of Southeast Asia.

Through the Gilman Scholarship Program, the U.S. Dept. of State offers funding "for students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies abroad.”  Dr. John Easterling, professor of intercultural studies, leads a group of students on an overseas internship every year, and found that six current students qualified for the scholarship.

Easterling called on Sally Harris, Ph.D., Northwestern’s Fulbright Program Advisor, to help five eligible students through the extensive application last fall.  In the spring, only Lenta and Thao were awarded initially, eventually followed by alternate Navamanie, awarded after other recipients declined the scholarship.

“I’ve always wanted to go to Japan…” said Navamanie, “And I’m really excited to spend a whole month in Thailand, just being there for so long and learning the culture.”

Before receiving the scholarship Navamanie was hoping to scrape together funding for the trip, but Thao said that without the funding, a trip overseas wouldn’t have been possible:

”I don’t have that many family members to support me financially, so it would have been really hard to make the trip happen.”

As the internship departure approaches, Thao, holds a quiet eagerness to return to family roots in Thailand, where her parents grew up after the Vietnam War.  Lenta expressed anticipation and gratitude similar to her fellow recipients:

“I feel so blessed to have been able to receive the scholarship and I am very excited to see the beauty that exists in other cultures,” she said.

While all three Gilman recipients are Intercultural Studies majors, the trip roster includes students majoring in psychology, studio arts, health science, accounting, ESL and elementary education.

“This (internship) program is open to the entire student body,” said Easterling, “But if a student goes on the trip, the need to declare an Intercultural Studies minor.”

This year, Easterling is co-leading the internship trip with Kai Thoni, a staff member from student development.  After touring Asia, the group will end their travels in December with a debrief in England.

Students can apply for the 2013 trip this fall and are required to attend a lab in the spring and completing eight credits of coursework in the fall before going overseas.  For more information, contact Professor John Easterling.

NWC President appointed to NCAA council

Nov. 20—President Alan Cureton, Ph.D., has been appointed to the NCAA Division III Presidents Council, becoming its first member to represent the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference.

"This is a great opportunity for Dr. Cureton to serve the over 450 NCAA Division III institutions in the United States," said Vice President for Student Life & Athletics Matt Hill '89, Ed.D., "The Presidents Council is considered the top committee in the organization as they deal with many legislative issues, student-athlete well-being issues, and encourage the co-curricular participation of over 100,000 student-athletes."

Dr. Cureton's appointment followed Brian Levin-Stankevich's necessary departure from the council as he transitioned into a new presidency with an NAIA institution, according to the NCAA.

Prior to this council position, Dr. Cureton has been leading for two years as a member of the NCAA Division III Nominating Committee and the NCAA Division III Chancellors/Presidents Advisory Group. He also serves as chair for the Midwest Athletic Conference Council of Presidents.

"His appointment is a great representation for Northwestern College and the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference," said Hill.

The Presidents Council meets on a quarterly basis at the NCAA national office in Indianapolis, Ind., and Dr. Cureton will join the council at the NCAA Convention in January. Though his term will expire in 2014, Dr. Cureton will be eligible for another four year appointment.

Dr. Cureton was inaugurated in January 2002 as the eighth president of Northwestern College. Under his leadership Northwestern College continues the commitment to build the college's academic, fiscal and program strengths while holding firm to the Christ-centered, biblical foundation upon which Northwestern was founded.

MPR features NWC cellist Ben Osterhouse

Nov 16 – While many professional orchestra musicians are putting down their instruments for picket signs in the Twin Cities this week, Benjamin Osterhouse will take bow to cello on Sunday night, serenading Roseville locals with his solo in Édouard Lalo's Cello Concerto in D Minor, accompanied by the Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra (MSO).

In April, Osterhouse won the MSO's concerto competition with his compelling performance of Lalo's piece, earning his place as a featured artist this season.  This was the first competition Osterhouse won, his long hours of practice starting last fall.

"I definitely knew of the Lalo violin concerto, and I had vaguely heard of his cello concerto, so I thought I would check it out," he said in an interview with Minnesota Public Radio, "When I listened to it I was blown away, and really wanted to play it right away."

Previously a composition major, Osterhouse decided to switch to cello performance, claiming that the more music he performs, the more diverse the inspiration for his own music, which includes Fantasia Toro, a cello solo.

"I used the imagery of a bull because it's supposed to be very passionate and strong, but it also has a very melancholy feel to it."

Osterhouse played his piece live in an interview with Minnesota Public Radio this morning, after sharing his anticipation for Sunday's performance. Themed The Spanish Connection, the concert at Roseville Lutheran Church features two Lalo pieces as well Pavane for Strings and Harp, a commissioned piece by local composer John Tartaglia.

 (Fantasia Toro begins at approx. 5 minutes)

 The Spanish Connection
November 18—4 p.m.
Roseville Lutheran Church
1215 Roselawn Avenue West
Roseville, MN 55113

 

MPR features NWC cellist: Ben Osterhouse solos with MInnesota Symphony

While many professional orchestra musicians are putting down their instruments for picket signs in the Twin Cities this week, Benjamin Osterhouse will take bow to cello on Sunday night, serenading Roseville locals with his solo in Édouard Lalo's Cello Concerto in D Minor, accompanied by the Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra (MSO).

In April, Osterhouse won the MSO's concerto competition with his compelling performance of Lalo's piece, earning his place as a featured artist this season.  This was the first competition Osterhouse won, his long hours of practice starting last fall.

"I definitely knew of the Lalo violin concerto, and I had vaguely heard of his cello concerto, so I thought I would check it out," he said in an interview with MSO, "When I listened to it I was blown away, and really wanted to play it right away."

Previously a composition major, Osterhouse decided to switch to cello performance, claiming that the more music he performs, the more diverse the inspiration for his own music, which includes Fantasia Toro, a cello solo.

"I used the imagery of a bull because it's supposed to be very passionate and strong, but it also has a very melancholy feel to it."

Osterhouse played his piece live in an interview with Minnesota Public Radio this morning, after sharing his anticipation for Sunday's performance. Themed The Spanish Connection, the concert at Roseville Lutheran Church features two Lalo pieces as well Pavane for Strings and Harp, a commissioned piece by local composer John Tartaglia.

 (Fantasia Toro begins at approx. 5 minutes)

The Spanish Connection
November 18—4 p.m.
Roseville Lutheran Church
1215 Roselawn Avenue West
Roseville, MN 55113

 

New books by Northwestern Faculty

You don't have to be sitting in a classroom to learn from our experienced professors—this year they've written four new books for you to enjoy anytime, anywhere.

 

 

The Trouble with Racial Reconciliation

Why John Perkins' Theological Approach Works
By Kenneth N. Young, D.Min., Ph.D.
Professor of Systematic Theology

The Trouble with Racial Reconciliation offers a biblical theology to redeem socially constructed racial and ethnic identities. The real solution for racism and ethnocentric problems lies not in human efforts to reconcile but in the sanctification process and in the implementation of a theology that outlines what it means to be and live “in Christ.”  

Purchase this book 

 

 

Understanding Theology in 15 Minutes a Day

By Daryl Aaron, D.Min., Ph.D.
Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies

Understanding Theology in 15 Minutes a Day answers forty critical questions about the Christian faith. Arranged by topic, you can choose the areas that interest you or systematically read through the book. Each section is short and easy to understand. You'll come away with a deeper faith  as you learn about the nature of God, heaven, the Bible, church, and even yourself.

Purchase this book

 

 

Understanding Your Bible in 15 Minutes a Day

By Daryl Aaron, D.Min., Ph.D.
Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies

Understanding Your Bible in 15 Minutes a Day answers your most important questions about the bestselling book in history. Broken into topical readings, you can read systematically from the beginning, or pick and choose topics of interest. Each reading is brief, engaging, and easy to understand. Whether you're a beginner or a seasoned reader of the Bible, in just minutes a day you'll soon have a better understanding of the Scriptures. 

Purchase this book

Understanding World Religions in 15 Minutes a Day

By Garry Morgan
Professor of Intercultural Studies

Globalization has brought people from every country and religion to our cities and neighborhoods. It has become essential for Western Christians to know something about these other faiths. Understanding World Religions in 15 Minutes a Day gives people a bite-sized introduction to the world’s religions as well as many of the newer religious movements.” 

Purchase this book 

Northwestern is Military Friendly

Oct. 2—Victory Media has named Northwestern to the coveted 2013 Military Friendly Schools ® list, an honor reserved for the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America's military service members, veterans, and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus.

"Inclusion on the 2013 list of Military Friendly Schools ® shows Northwestern's commitment to providing a supportive environment for military students," said Sean Collins, Director for G.I. Jobs and Vice President at Victory Media.

Northwestern joins 1,739 colleges, universities and trade schools on this year's list recognized for leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience, as well as world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility, and other services.

Tech Sgt. Brandon Lancaster experienced a "military friendly" Northwestern when he joined the FOCUS program in 2009, transferring 90 credits from community college and previous military education. While pursuing a degree in business management, he found flexibility to accommodate his ongoing military career.

"The school couldn't have been better for me," Lancaster said, "There were times I needed to take an incomplete or needed an extension on an assignment, and the teachers were really flexible with that. That was a big deal, because I don't really have control over my military schedule."

After graduating in 2010 and starting a family, Lancaster decided to begin a transition out of his paralegal job into a business career. He sought guidance from Northwestern's Center for Calling & Career, partnering with assistant director Dianne-Lloyd Dennis to refine his resume.

"I had a meeting with Dianne and it couldn't have been better. She knew just by looking at my resume that I should be more confident about my qualification and my skills," he said, "It was a really big confidence booster and that was key in me taking the position I'm in now."

Lancaster manages a JAG office for the U.S. Air Force and works as a performance manager for CenterPoint Legal Solutions.

A full story and detailed list of 2013 Military Friendly Schools ® will be highlighted in the annual G.I. Jobs Guide to Military Friendly Schools ®, distributed in print and digital format to hundreds of thousands of active and former military personnel in early October.

Holy history: students embark on Boston

For the historian who loves seafood, there is no better eatery than America’s oldest restaurant, Union Oyster House in Boston.  On the first Saturday in October, five Northwestern students filled a booth at that very oyster house, sitting across from former president John F. Kennedy’s preferred booth.  Over plates of freshly shucked oysters and bowls of clam chowder, they celebrated the end of the biennial Faith and History Conference, hosted by Gordon College.

After days of papers, panels and plenary sessions, Professor of History Jonathan Den Hartog had encouraged his students to spend Saturday morning in the historic city just down the coast from Gordon where they walked most of the Freedom Trail, a path weaving through sites like Paul Revere’s old north church and Bunker Hill.

During the three-day conference, budding historians Scott Anderson ‘12, Rosie Muska ‘13, Adam Saxton ’13, Ricky Seaman ’12 and alum Justin Myhra ’12 presented papers that garnered praise from panel commentators and professors alike, including one suggested publication and several requested copies of their work.

“These students gave very clear and compelling presentations and interacted well with the audiences who were present,” Den Hartog said, “I am biased, but I thought in several panels our students clearly had the best research presentation.”

Saxton and Muska had exchanged papers mid-flight to Boston and were presently surprised.  Muska’s paper, Journeying from Left to Right: How Post-Communist Conservatives Changed American Politics, ended with the Reagan presidency, precisely where Saxton’s paper, Fusion to Fission: Conflicts within the Conservative Movement, began.  At the conference Muska ended her presentation with a handoff to Saxton, creating a clever panorama of conservatism.

Anderson, a history major and Civil War aficionado, infamous during his elementary days for spouting random war facts to any willing listener, presented a paper on his favorite subject.

In Military Memoirs and Memory he advocated that historians should resist the temptation to take Civil War memoirs at face value as factual accounts of the war.

You can learn a lot through the memoirs, but you get to look at [the generals’] lives through their publishing eyes.  They were often involved in politics, and it was in their best interest to portray themselves in the best light.”

In one historical hiccup, General Chamberlain claimed in his memoir a goodwill exchange of salutes with a Confederate general during the formal surrender ceremony.  Anderson explained that this “healing moment for the nation” was never accounted for in any soldier’s memoir (some 20,000 were present) making its reality questionable.

Beyond the facts and figures most of us associate with history, Anderson is concerned that people develop their understanding of yesterday to make healthy decisions today.

"It's often considered cliché to say we learn from our mistakes.  I think we can study the past to learn about successes, to learn about individual lives,” he said, “In every person there is a lesson to be learned, in every event.”

Saxton shares a similar passion for harvesting historic value, so much that he changed his major from history to an interdisciplinary degree in international relations, specializing in government and politics. While he expressed being in awe of the historical academic community at the conference, Saxton also agreed with the critique spoken by the president of the organization, who cautioned that "historians need to make history more accessible to the general public.”

Northwestern’s history department is turning out thoughtful historians like Adina Johnson ’10 and Benjamin Brandenburg ’06. who are pursuing graduate studies and were present at the conference, creating quite a  reunion.

“The conference was a fantastic opportunity for networking,” said Anderson, “And to remember what makes history so good.”

The Conference on Faith and History is a community of scholars exploring the relationship between Christian faith and history. They welcome members from a variety of Christian traditions and seek to learn from scholars outside the Christian tradition, with a primary goal is to encourage excellence in the theory and practice of history from the perspective of historic Christianity.
 

Holy history: Students embark on Boston for 2012 Conference on Faith & History

Oct 25—For the historian who loves seafood, there is no better eatery than America’s oldest restaurant, Union Oyster House in Boston.  On the first Saturday in October, five Northwestern students filled a booth at that very oyster house, sitting across from former president John F. Kennedy’s preferred booth.  Over plates of freshly shucked oysters and bowls of clam chowder, they celebrated the end of the biennial Faith and History Conference, hosted by Gordon College.

After days of papers, panels and plenary sessions, Professor of History Jonathan Den Hartog had encouraged his students to spend Saturday morning in the historic city just down the coast from Gordon where they walked most of the Freedom Trail, a path weaving through sites like Paul Revere’s old north church and Bunker Hill.

During the three-day conference, budding historians Scott Anderson ‘12, Rosie Muska ‘13, Adam Saxton ’13, Ricky Seaman ’12 and alum Justin Myhra ’12 presented papers that garnered praise from panel commentators and professors alike, including one suggested publication and several requested copies of their work.

“These students gave very clear and compelling presentations and interacted well with the audiences who were present,” Den Hartog said, “I am biased, but I thought in several panels our students clearly had the best research presentation.”

Saxton and Muska had exchanged papers mid-flight to Boston and were presently surprised.  Muska’s paper, Journeying from Left to Right: How Post-Communist Conservatives Changed American Politics, ended with the Reagan presidency, precisely where Saxton’s paper, Fusion to Fission: Conflicts within the Conservative Movement, began.  At the conference Muska ended her presentation with a handoff to Saxton, creating a clever panorama of conservatism.

Anderson, a history major and Civil War aficionado, infamous during his elementary days for spouting random war facts to any willing listener, presented a paper on his favorite subject.

In Military Memoirs and Memory he advocated that historians should resist the temptation to take Civil War memoirs at face value as factual accounts of the war.

You can learn a lot through the memoirs, but you get to look at [the generals’] lives through their publishing eyes.  They were often involved in politics, and it was in their best interest to portray themselves in the best light.”

In one historical hiccup, General Chamberlain claimed in his memoir a goodwill exchange of salutes with a Confederate general during the formal surrender ceremony.  Anderson explained that this “healing moment for the nation” was never accounted for in any soldier’s memoir (some 20,000 were present) making its reality questionable.

Beyond the facts and figures most of us associate with history, Anderson is concerned that people develop their understanding of yesterday to make healthy decisions today.

"It's often considered cliché to say we learn from our mistakes.  I think we can study the past to learn about successes, to learn about individual lives,” he said, “In every person there is a lesson to be learned, in every event.”

Saxton shares a similar passion for harvesting historic value, so much that he changed his major from history to an interdisciplinary degree in international relations, specializing in government and politics. While he expressed being in awe of the historical academic community at the conference, Saxton also agreed with the critique spoken by the president of the organization, who cautioned that "historians need to make history more accessible to the general public.”

Northwestern’s history department is turning out thoughtful historians like Adina Johnson ’10 and Benjamin Brandenburg ’06. who are pursuing graduate studies and were present at the conference, creating quite a  reunion.

“The conference was a fantastic opportunity for networking,” said Anderson, “And to remember what makes history so good.”

The Conference on Faith and History is a community of scholars exploring the relationship between Christian faith and history. They welcome members from a variety of Christian traditions and seek to learn from scholars outside the Christian tradition, with a primary goal is to encourage excellence in the theory and practice of history from the perspective of historic Christianity.
 

Trade of Innocents: Alumna produces anti-trafficking film

Watch the Trailer
Read a Review 

Oct. 4Trade of Innocents, a sorrowfully hopeful story from the dark underworld of modern slavery, is lighting theatres and minds across the country this fall with one idea: Justice needs a hero. Be one. After the film premiere last week, producer and Northwestern alumna Laurie Bolthouse ’89 is seeing five years of dreams on the big screen.

When the lights dim, moviegoers follow investigator Alex Becker (Dermot Mulroney) and his wife Claire (Mia Sorvino) into a small Southeast Asian tourist town where they fight an impervious local sex trade. Beyond the big screen, a similar tourist town in Cambodia plays in Bolthouse's memory as the place where slavery became real to her for the first time.

Prayer to production

“My daughters and I were on holiday for a few days in the south of Cambodia while my husband William was working with a medical team back in Phnom Pehn,” she said, “We found ourselves able to host a lovely family style dinner for 6-7 girls recently rescued from the brothels there in the town we were vacationing in.”

International Justice Mission (IJM) was helping the girls prepare to testify to a judge and arranged for the dinner with the Bolthouses.  Even with a language barrier, the women laughed and enjoyed the evening together.  When the girls left, the reality of their experience moved Bolthouse and her daughters to sobbing and prayer. 

“We cried out in anger to God and told him he had to do more than just allow us to have a nice dinner for these girls,” she said, “We begged and beseeched Him, ‘Please do something!’”

After returning to the states, the IJM field director emailed that the girls experienced healing that night at dinner and had testified confidently.  Bolthouse thought that was the answer, until they received a letter from friend and director Christopher Bessette, asking them partner with him on a script he was writing.  By 2009, the Bolthouses joined Bessette to produce Trade of Innocents.

Northwestern students pitch in

Inspiring viewers to action was a core value for the film, and in 2011 the Bolthouses ran a collegiate marketing competition to generate ideas for reaching college students as a key audience.  A Northwestern team of students—Hannah Rivard , Anna Carey , Kimberly Mills, Ross Fleming, Josh Svendsen and Lauren Wineinger—won the $12,000 scholarship with their action-focused marketing campaign, “Join the Justice Generation.” 

A year later, Trade of Innocents marketing materials carry clear traces of the team’s creativity, including Justice-Generation.com, an online advocacy center, connects viewers with organizations like Polaris Project, IJM and Invisible Children, and a resource page for film discussions and events. The film was designed to reveal not only a horrible reality, but also that the hope for changing that reality rests on each viewer and how they respond.

“We are not making a Christian film and appealing to the Christian audience only.  We are marketing to all people.  Our desire is to see all levels of people’s knowledge about trafficking heightened from unaware to aware, and for those in the know to be moved toward more deliberate action.”

Trade of Innocents
is showing nationally this fall. For a showing schedule and other information, you can visit tradeofinnocents.com

 

review

 

Trade of Innocents: "Not an outreach film; it’s a social justice film"

By Matt Pelishek '06, production director/host at KAXL 88.3


Bakersfield, Calif.—While it is not marketed as a ‘Christian’ film, Trade of Innocents was produced by followers of Jesus who really want to be a catalyst for action to those Jesus referred to as ‘the least of these.’  This is a film about the horrible reality of human trafficking. While I had the opportunity to attend a media screening, I also had to sign a strict confidentiality agreement, so while I can’t give plot points, I can tell you, this is a film that must be supported.

This is not an outreach film, it’s a social justice film. It is about the fight against human trafficking in Cambodia. Most importantly, they got it right. It wasn’t just the high production value, it was also the cast, including academy award winner Mira Sorvino. It is real and gritty and at times hard to watch, but never gratuitous. Having been produced by people from my home here in Bakersfield, CA (including alumna Laurie Bolthouse '89), I was downright proud.  One thing I really appreciated about the film was that it never felt dramatized or beefed up for excitement—although more than once I found myself really wanting Liam Neesen to show up and start breaking faces.  It felt real.

This is a movie that needs our support.  It has industry support from big names like Will and Jada Pinkett Smith and Ashton Kutcher, but we have all seen how Christians can influence a film by really getting behind it.  This is a film that practically requires that you do something about it, and in the end credits, does in fact tell you how you can.  Compare this to most Christian films I’ve seen where the only action I want to take is to watch something else.

Like it or not, slavery is still very much in existence, as is the sexual exploitation of young children.  And no, it is not just a third world problem, it happens right here in the United States.  Trade of Innocents is poised to to make a big difference.  I’m in no way affiliated with the film or filmmakers, but would ask that you visit the website, which includes movie information, as well as resources and ways you can join the fight.

Trade of Innocents is an amazing example of Jesus followers using their talents with excellence to ignite change in some of the most hurting and dark places on the planet.  It isn’t just a movie, it is a call to action. 

The rest is up to you.

Trade of Innocents: Alumna produces anti-trafficking film

Trade of Innocents, a sorrowfully hopeful story from the dark underworld of modern slavery, is lighting theatres and minds across the country this fall with one idea: Justice needs a hero. Be one. After the film premiere last week, producer and Northwestern alumna Laurie Bolthouse ’89 is seeing five years of dreams on the big screen.

When the lights dim, moviegoers follow investigator Alex Becker (Dermot Mulroney) and his wife Claire (Mia Sorvino) into a small Southeast Asian tourist town where they fight an impervious local sex trade. Beyond the big screen, a similar tourist town in Cambodia plays in Bolthouse's memory as the place where slavery became real to her for the first time.

Prayer to production

“My daughters and I were on holiday for a few days in the south of Cambodia while my husband William was working with a medical team back in Phnom Pehn,” she said, “We found ourselves able to host a lovely family style dinner for 6-7 girls recently rescued from the brothels there in the town we were vacationing in.”

International Justice Mission (IJM) was helping the girls prepare to testify to a judge and arranged for the dinner with the Bolthouses.  Even with a language barrier, the women laughed and enjoyed the evening together.  When the girls left, the reality of their experience moved Bolthouse and her daughters to sobbing and prayer. 

“We cried out in anger to God and told him he had to do more than just allow us to have a nice dinner for these girls,” she said, “We begged and beseeched Him, ‘Please do something!’”

After returning to the states, the IJM field director emailed that the girls experienced healing that night at dinner and had testified confidently.  Bolthouse thought that was the answer, until they received a letter from friend and director Christopher Bessette, asking them to partner with him on a script he was writing.  By 2009, the Bolthouses joined Bessette to produce Trade of Innocents.

Northwestern students pitch in

Inspiring viewers to action was a core value for the film, and in 2011 the Bolthouses ran a collegiate marketing competition to generate ideas for reaching college students as a key audience.  A Northwestern team of students—Hannah Rivard , Anna Carey , Kimberly Mills, Ross Fleming, Josh Svendsen and Lauren Wineinger—won the $12,000 scholarship with their action-focused marketing campaign, “Join the Justice Generation.” 

A year later, Trade of Innocents marketing materials carry clear traces of the team’s creativity, including Justice-Generation.com, an online advocacy center, connects viewers with organizations like Polaris Project, IJM and Invisible Children, and a resource page for film discussions and events. The film was designed to reveal not only a horrible reality, but also that the hope for changing that reality rests on each viewer and how they respond.

“We are not making a Christian film and appealing to the Christian audience only.  We are marketing to all people.  Our desire is to see all levels of people’s knowledge about trafficking heightened from unaware to aware, and for those in the know to be moved toward more deliberate action.”

Trade of Innocents
is showing nationally this fall. For a showing schedule and other information, you can visit tradeofinnocents.com

Trade of Innocents: "Not an outreach film; it’s a social justice film"

By Matt Pelishek '06, production director/host at KAXL 88.3


Bakersfield, Calif.—While it is not marketed as a ‘Christian’ film, Trade of Innocents was produced by followers of Jesus who really want to be a catalyst for action to those Jesus referred to as ‘the least of these.’  This is a film about the horrible reality of human trafficking. While I had the opportunity to attend a media screening, I also had to sign a strict confidentiality agreement, so while I can’t give plot points, I can tell you, this is a film that must be supported.

This is not an outreach film, it’s a social justice film. It is about the fight against human trafficking in Cambodia. Most importantly, they got it right. It wasn’t just the high production value, it was also the cast, including academy award winner Mira Sorvino. It is real and gritty and at times hard to watch, but never gratuitous. Having been produced by people from my home here in Bakersfield, CA (including alumna Laurie Bolthouse '89), I was downright proud.  One thing I really appreciated about the film was that it never felt dramatized or beefed up for excitement—although more than once I found myself really wanting Liam Neesen to show up and start breaking faces.  It felt real.

This is a movie that needs our support.  It has industry support from big names like Will and Jada Pinkett Smith and Ashton Kutcher, but we have all seen how Christians can influence a film by really getting behind it.  This is a film that practically requires that you do something about it, and in the end credits, does in fact tell you how you can.  Compare this to most Christian films I’ve seen where the only action I want to take is to watch something else.

Like it or not, slavery is still very much in existence, as is the sexual exploitation of young children.  And no, it is not just a third world problem, it happens right here in the United States.  Trade of Innocents is poised to to make a big difference.  I’m in no way affiliated with the film or filmmakers, but would ask that you visit the website, which includes movie information, as well as resources and ways you can join the fight.

Trade of Innocents is an amazing example of Jesus followers using their talents with excellence to ignite change in some of the most hurting and dark places on the planet.  It isn’t just a movie, it is a call to action. 

The rest is up to you.

Northwestern is Military Friendly

Victory Media has named Northwestern to the coveted 2013 Military Friendly Schools ® list, an honor reserved for the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America's military service members, veterans, and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus.

"Inclusion on the 2013 list of Military Friendly Schools ® shows Northwestern's commitment to providing a supportive environment for military students," said Sean Collins, Director for G.I. Jobs and Vice President at Victory Media.

Northwestern joins 1,739 colleges, universities and trade schools on this year's list recognized for leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience, as well as world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility, and other services.

Tech Sgt. Brandon Lancaster experienced a "military friendly" Northwestern when he joined the FOCUS program in 2009, transferring 90 credits from community college and previous military education. While pursuing a degree in business management, he found flexibility to accommodate his ongoing military career.

"The school couldn't have been better for me," Lancaster said, "There were times I needed to take an incomplete or needed an extension on an assignment, and the teachers were really flexible with that. That was a big deal, because I don't really have control over my military schedule."

After graduating in 2010 and starting a family, Lancaster decided to begin a transition out of his paralegal job into a business career. He sought guidance from Northwestern's Center for Calling & Career, partnering with assistant director Dianne-Lloyd Dennis to refine his resume.

"I had a meeting with Dianne and it couldn't have been better. She knew just by looking at my resume that I should be more confident about my qualification and my skills," he said, "It was a really big confidence booster and that was key in me taking the position I'm in now."

Lancaster manages a JAG office for the U.S. Air Force and works as a performance manager for CenterPoint Legal Solutions.

A full story and detailed list of 2013 Military Friendly Schools ® will be highlighted in the annual G.I. Jobs Guide to Military Friendly Schools ®, distributed in print and digital format to hundreds of thousands of active and former military personnel in early October.

Faculty book recognized at CCDA National Conference

Sept. 26—As the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA) National Conference begins today in the Twin Cities, Northwestern professor of systematic theology Kenneth Young, Ph.D., is preparing to introduce conference-goers to his book, The Trouble with Racial Reconciliation: Why John Perkins' Theological Approach Works. With "RECONCILE" as its theme, the conference is an ideal launching point for the book, which reflects the ideas of CCDA chair emeritus Dr. John Perkins.

Young believes CCDA is one of the “most effective instances of applied theology we have operating in the United States,” and encourages people to attend the conference.

As a new member of CCDA, Northwestern is joining churches, nonprofits, businesses and colleges this week in a united mission “to bear witness to the Kingdom of God by reclaiming and restoring under-resourced communities.”

With a vision for true reconciliation, Young  develops three related concepts in his book: He exposes the roots of racism in biblical history, reveals a false “compensatory identity” that began after the fall, and encourages people to reject that false identity and embrace the full power of the gospel to reconcile with each other and with God through Christ.
“I think we are low-balling the real power of the gospel, the atonement,” said Young.

David Fenrick, Ph.D., director of Northwestern’s Center for Global Reconciliation and Cultural Education (C-GRACE) is on the host planning team for the conference, and expressed his hope for true reconciliation:

“Wherever there are broken relationships, between human beings, but also between us and the environment, or broken relationships historically, that’s where the good news of reconciliation speaks and brings life and hope,” he said, “The gospel reconciles us to God but it also reconciles us together in the new community.“

Students from the Urban Cross-Cultural College Consortium (U4C) will be attending the conference as well, according to Fenrick. U4C is a partnership between Northwestern College, Concordia University and Crown College that allows students to live and study in an urban setting.

Young will present his book with Perkins on Friday, September 28 at 8:30 a.m. at the Hilton hotel in Minneapolis. The general public is also invited to attend free plenary sessions with speakers like Shane Claiborne, Tony Campolo and John Perkins.

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